GBBD in the Town Mouse Garden

We're at the cusp of fall, and the days are noticeably getting shorter. This is the time for surprises. Plants that didn't do much since spring, taking a rest during the long dry summer days, are suddenly putting out just a few more blossoms. This is what the hummingbird sage above is doing. And, even more surprisingly, Aristolochia californica (California dutchman's pipe) is blooming as well.


More in season is the goldenrod. I bought three Solidago canadensis last year because they are not at all invasive. Unfortunately, they also don't bloom too impressively and they flop over, so I'm reconsidering and might plant the more aggressive native goldenrod next year.


The buckwheats, glory of the summer garden, are slowly starting to fade. Eriogonum arborescens is turning a beautiful shade of rusty pink. I love a plant that still looks great when it's past its prime.


Another Eriogonum in the back garden is actually just starting to reach its best bloom time and attractive to butterflies and pollinators for months to come (enlarge the picture below for a better view of the different shades of white, cream, and rose).


The star of the back garden is still Epilobium (California fuchsia). The low-growing UC Hybrid has filled in well.


And from the sunroom window I can see the red blossoms of the tall cultivar, and, in the back-ground, the salmon-colored medium-sized cultivar. I grew these plants from cuttings I received from a friend so I really don't know the names - but I'm happy to share cuttings with friends who visit.


Another fall favorite (and not a California native) is this Sedum, which I've paired with California fuchsia and some sages and yarrow. It's humming with bees and other pollinators as well.


And last but not least the Mimulus hybrid (monkey flower) that would not die. Protected from the harsh afternoon sun at the east side of the house, this plant has been blooming non stop all summer.


And now I'll head over to Carol at May Dreams Gardens to see who else is showing us around in their gardens. Won't you join me?

Oh, and by the way, if you enjoy Bloom Day, I do want to invite you to First Views, a Meme Country Mouse and I started recently. We're showing of our garden views (not our blooms) in the first week of each month. Here's a little taste...

Comments

Larry said…
Some lovely colors... especially in your first picture... they always seem more stunning in fall light! Larry
greggo said…
love the header photo this best.
Rebecca said…
Every time I see the California Aristolochia, I can't believe how much it differs from my Missouri native pipevine. Great post and beautiful blooms :)
CommonWeeder said…
I especially love those fuschias. I broke a nursery plant I bought in the spring, but planted it anyway and it recovered and is just now starting to bloom.
LOVE the 'mokey flower', very pretty!
Happy GBBD :)
Birdwoman said…
Nice to see somebody's Dutchman's pipe vine is blooming. Mine is growing well, but so far has nary a bloom. But then we have had that "exceptional" drought all summer. I guess I should just be glad it's alive. Your blooms are lovely.
scottweberpdx said…
Love the Buckwheats...all of them! I wonder if they would do well here in Portland?
Bernie said…
Great blooms to show off for GBBD. The Dutchman's Pipe Vine blooms are fantastic!
dorothy said…
I love the natural look of your garden. I especially like the CA fuchsia and the salvia clevelandii. Pretty colors!
rosalie+gesine said…
Liebe Town Mouse,
danke daß du bei Blogger-Blüten mitgemacht hast! Da habe ich dann wenigstens schon mal eine deutschsprachige Teilnehmerin, wow ;-)
Ich finde es sehr schön, wie du deinen Garten nur mit Wildblumen gestaltest. Ich habe das in einem Garten auch mal gemacht und eine Weile hatte ich auch nur Wildblumen auf meinem Balkon.
Viele Grüße!
Gesine
I love the colours of the hummingbird sage and the combination of the sedum and the California fuschia.
James said…
You've got to love the aristolochia this time of year. Of our natives it's got some of the most intriguing flower structures. Thanks for sharing your September highlights.